The Knapp and Hinkley Livery, circa 1890

Leaving the Getchell House at 1122 Second Street to continue our imaginary 19th Century walking tour, we would most likely follow our nose to Knapp and Hinkley’s Livery next door.

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Sanborn Insurance Map

Owners Sewell M. Knapp and Elwin B. Hinkley were in business when the first insurance maps of Snohomish were published in 1888. Cyrus H. Knapp was a first cousin to Sewell and we assume a business partner since he is identified in the historic image as the man on the extreme right.

Cyrus was an active participant in the civic affairs of early Snohomish, serving as a council member in 1891, and on the committee to establish a fire department. This may explain why The Eye would describe his wagon shop as the place for catching up on the town gossip.

On January 30, 1892, The Eye reported a hilarious story “The Porker Escapes” that has been published in River Reflections, Part II on page 152. The short version is that Councilman Knapp joined Mayor Ferguson and Marshall Cleveland in pursuit of a large pig running loose on Second Street. Just as the men, joined by two school boys, had the rebellious beast cornered, it insisted on paying a visit to the Presbyterian church on Avenue A, (where our Then-and-Now tour began in July).

2012-09_knapp This badly faded print is the only one we have of this popular early Snohomish business, often mentioned in the local newspaper The Eye. As if to make up for the poor condition of the photograph, the names of the men posing for the camera are listed on the reverse. From the left, A. C. Carpenter, L.A. Carter, Ora C. Knapp, Pat Coffee, and Cyrus H. Knapp.

Thanks to Ann Tuohy and David Dilgard, Northwest Room, Everett Public Library for research help on this story.

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Published in the Snohomish County Tribune, September 19, 2012.

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